Prospects for Transformative Innovation Policy Conference: 20-21 September 2017.

Venue:
Protea Hotel Fire and Ice by Marriott, Menlyn, Pretoria, South Africa.

This two-day conference was hosted by the South African National Research Foundation (NRF) in partnership with the Department of Science and Technology (DST) and the Transformative Innovation Policy Consortium.

The 2017 Conference Programme outline can be viewed below. The Conference Report will be available shortly. For starters, here's a snapshot.

Conference delegation 2017

The Honourable Minister, HE Naledi Pandor waits to give the Keynote Address to the Conference

The Honourable Minister, HE Naledi Pandor waits to give the Keynote Address to the Conference

HE Naledi Pandor urges the scientific community to fully address gender and diversity issues to expand knowledge and understanding

Powerful and inspiring Keynote Address Delivered by HE Naledi Pandor, Minister for Science & Technology

Professor Johan Schot, SPRu Director, gives the salient insights for TIPC’s pilot year

Conference delegation listening to Professor Schot’s presentation on TIPC’s Exploratory Year Insights

Bitrina Diyamett, Executive Director of STIPRO from Tanzania questions Professor Schot

Thought-provoking questions from Professor Mark Swilling, Stellenbosch University to Professor Schot

University of Sussex VC, Professor Adam Tickell gives a video address to delegates stressing the importance of TIPC to the University

Delegate discussions of plenary sessions

Goran Marklund, Deputy Director General at Vinnova, Sweden; Erika Kraemer-Mbula, Senior Researcher, South African Research Chair in Industrial Development, University of Johannesburg; and Imraan Patel, Deputy Director General Department for Science & Technology, South Africa listen to plenary addresses

TIPC Members signal their commitment to join the 5-year programme of experimentation, research, capacity-building and evaluation of Transformative Innovation Policy

WELCOME FROM THE TIPC CONFERENCE: PROSPECTS FOR TRANSFORMATIVE INNOVATION POLICY

At the culmination of our exciting exploratory year, I am delighted to welcome a great cross-section of delegates to our inaugural TIPC conference.

This event is the finale to our pilot programme of activities for the Transformative Innovation Policy Consortium’s founding members. We have started to test ideas and rationales; built strong, productive relationships; and most crucially, begun to identify the directions to go and the difficult questions to ask. We may be a long way from the answers, but the exploration for fresh policy thinking and practice in Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) has commenced with commitment and rigour. While daunting on one level, it is the distance we have to travel that is the most thrilling part.

Our vision is an essential one. We know building new knowledge, and the associated narratives and frameworks, is complex. Yet, we know too that our current systems of provision for our basic needs are not fit for the task ahead. We need to experiment, research, evaluate, disseminate, write and communicate new STI practice that supports developing the world sustainably. Together, over these two days we will debate, formulate and co-create to add new layers of knowledge to our emerging theory of Transformative Innovation Policy. We are commencing the next chapter in our exciting and promising TIPC story. I hope that you have an engaging and enriching inaugural 2017 conference.



Professor Johan Schot
Director, Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex
Professor of History of Technology and Sustainability Transitions

WEDNESDAY 20
SEPTEMBER 2017

08:00 - 09:00 - Registration

09:00 - 10:10
OPENING REMARKS

Dr Aldo Stroebel, Executive Director Strategic Partnerships, National Research Foundation of South Africa


KEYNOTE ADDRESS
The Honourable Minister, HE Naledi Pandor, , Department of Science and Technology


ADDRESS BY UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX, UK
Professor Adam Tickell,Vice Chancellor

11:00 - 11:30 - Break

11:30 - 13:00
PLENARY 2:

The Transformative Innovation Policy Consortium: Insights and results from the pilot programme and future plans

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - 15:30
PARALLEL SESSION 1A:
South Africa: Technology for rural education and development


PARALLEL SESSION 1B:
Finland: Low-carbon and smart mobility solutions for passenger transport

15:30 - 15:45 - Break

15:45 - 17:15
PARALLEL SESSION 2A:
Colombia: Productive transformations in coffee production


PARALLEL SESSION 2B:
Norway: Responsible research and innovation practices in Biotechnology for Innovation


PARALLEL SESSION 2C:
Sweden: Challenge-driven innovation initiatives

15:30 - 15:45 - Conference Dinner - Summit Grill

THURSDAY
21 SEPTEMBER 2017

09:00 - 09:30
WELCOME TO DAY 2

Zooming out to explore prospects for Transformative Innovation Policy

Joanna Chataway (SPRU, University of Sussex) and Imraan Patel, Department of Science and Technology (South Africa)

09:30 - 11:00
PARALLEL SESSION 3A:

Revisiting science, technology and innovation: country reviews from a transformative change perspective


PARALLEL SESSION 3B:

R&D investment and transformation


PARALLEL SESSION 3C:

Social justice and transformations to sustainability: snapshots of current work


PARALLEL SESSION 3D:

New perspectives in the evaluation of science, technology and innovation

11:00 - 11:30 - Break

11:30 - 13:00
PARALLEL SESSION 4A:

Policy mixes for transformative change


PARALLEL SESSION 4B:

Innovation policies for the informal economy


PARALLEL SESSION 4C:

Policy experimentation


PARALLEL SESSION 4D:

National systems of innovation transformation

13:00 - 14:15 - Lunch

14:15 - 15:45
PARALLEL SESSION 4A:

Innovation for inclusive development


PARALLEL SESSION 4B:

Capability building and training for transformative innovation policy and policymaking


PARALLEL SESSION 4C:

Upscaling experimentation


PARALLEL SESSION 4D:

Can regional innovation policy facilitate transitions?

15:45 - 16:30 - Closing Session

THE TRANSFORMATIVE INNOVATION POLICY CONSORTIUM

The creation of the Transformative Innovation Policy Consortium (TIPC) is in answer to the need for fresh directions for science, technology and innovation policies towards outcomes that sustainably enhance societies.

Based around the Frame 3 perspective of Transformative Innovation Policy, the Consortium and its partners are shaping the agenda in experimenting with and developing alternative frameworks, methods and metrics for Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) policy to reach new achievements.

With this drive for enhanced thinking in innovation practice comes the inevitable threat of upheaval. However, in disruption there stands the potential for developments that could successfully sustain populations and the environment into the next century. While facing varying challenges - from inequality, to economic stagnation, to reliance on fossil fuels – all countries in the world find themselves at a crucial juncture.

New approaches to develop – for example our energy, mobility, health, finance and food systems – to make them fit-for-purpose must happen relatively swiftly. With the desire and commitment to co-create the next generation of science, technology and innovation theory, policy and practice, TIPC brings together people from research, policy and their constituencies. The expectation is that Frame 3 on transformative change will interplay and combine with previous framings of innovation policy – Frame 1 (R&D) and Frame 2 (National Systems of Innovation) – to provide alternative policy mixes and initiatives which place socio-technical change, human flourishing, welfare and environmental advancements at the fore.

The past year has set a benchmark for testing ideas and rationales in beginning to explore and identify new policy thinking and practices in STI based on shared learning with stakeholders across the globe. This event will present among others, outcomes from pilot studies conducted by Transformative Innovation Policy Consortium’s founding members.

Members of TIPC are: the Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex; Colombian Administrative Department of Science, Technology & Innovation – Colciencias; the Research Council of Norway; The South African National Research Foundation; Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems – VINNOVA; and Tekes – the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation.

For our hosts, the South African Department of Science and Technology (DST) and the National Research Foundation (NRF), the conference builds on other existing initiatives on the African continent and beyond, such as the Global Research Council, and the Science Granting Council Initiative (SGCI) in Sub-Saharan Africa; aimed at strengthening the capacities of science granting councils to support effectively research and evidence-based policies that will contribute to economic and social development. This, too, is a central TIPC aim for all members.

By expanding the narrative and knowledge around Transformative Innovation Policy, new pathways and partnerships can be forged. The prospects for TIP – here at our inaugural conference and beyond to the 5-year programme - are exciting and challenging in breaking new ground for the entire globe.

DAY ONE:
PLENARY SESSIONS


PLENARY 1: THE TRANSFORMATIVE INNOVATION POLICY CONSORTIUM: INSIGHTS AND RESULTS FROM THE PILOT PROGRAMME AND FUTURE PLANS

Speaker
Johan Schot

Director, Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex, Professor of History of Technology and Sustainability Transitions


PLENARY 2: DISCUSSION WITH FOUNDING MEMBERS FROM SOUTH AFRICA, NORWAY, FINLAND, COLOMBIA, SWEDEN

Speakers
Elisabeth Gulbrandsen

Special Adviser, Division for Innovation, Department for Strategic Analysis and Development, Research Council of Norway
Imraan Patel,
Deputy Director General, Socio-Economic Innovation Partnerships, Department of Science & Technology, South Africa
Göran Marklund,
Deputy Director General and Head of Operational Development, Vinnova, Sweden
Maria Isabel Velez Agudelo,
Head of Policy and Evaluation Unit, Colciencias, Colombia
Christopher Palmberg,,
Development Manager, Tekes – the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation

COUNTRY FOCUSED PARALLEL SESSIONS

The creation of the Transformative Innovation Policy Consortium (TIPC) is in answer to the need for fresh directions for science, technology and innovation policies towards outcomes that sustainably enhance societies.

The pilot year has given TIPC a starting point. This has been the first step towards the co- creation – by policymakers, academics, civil society and academics – of new knowledge, narratives and prospects for Transformative Innovation Policy articulating the Three Frames Framework. It has included historical analysis of innovation policy in each country from a ‘Frame3’ perspective. This resulted in a brief country overview, and a Transformative Innovation Learning History (TILH) case study. To select the cases, TIPC developed a number of transformative change criteria such as recognition of directionality; whether policy was led by social or environmental challenge; whether policy was aimed at system innovation; if learning and reflexivity were prominent; and whether there was a recognition of diversity of interests and needs to articulate dissensus as well as consensus. Using the TILH methodology was useful for both research and policy reflection, and included multiply ‘voices’ in the anyalsis. These country focused sessions draw inspiration and insights from both the country reviews and the case studies to help understand ‘Prospects for Transformative Innovation Policy’ in specific contexts.


PARALLEL SESSION 1A: SOUTH AFRICA: TECHNOLOGY FOR RURAL EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT

Abstract
Twenty-three years after democracy, South Africa remains a highly unequal society where too many people live in poverty and too few work. The quality of school education for most black learners is poor. The apartheid spatial divide continues to dominate the landscape. A large proportion of young people feel that the odds are stacked against them and the legacy of apartheid continues to determine the life opportunities for the vast majority.

South Africa adopted a National Development Plan (NDP) in August 2012 in order to address the triple challenge of poverty, inequality, and unemployment. The NDP recognises that ‘national development has never been a linear process’ proceeding ‘in a straight line’. The NDP therefore proposes a ‘multidimensional framework to bring about a virtuous cycle of development, with progress in one area supporting advances in others’.

National development will not succeed without a deep transition of the education system including rural schooling. Innovation and technology has emerged as an important determinant in the envisaged transition. This session will critically reflect on current efforts by the Department of Science and Technology (DST) on the technology for rural education and development initiative (Tech4RED) from a Transformation Innovation Policy perspective.

Panellists
Sepo Hachigonta, Director, Strategy, Planning and Partnerships, National Research Foundation of South Africa
Imraan Patel, Deputy Director-General, Department of Science and Technology, The three frames of innovation policy within the context of South Africa
Erika Kraemer-Mbula (Chair) Senior Researcher, South African Research Chair in Industrial Development, University of Johannesburg; Associate Professor Extraordinary, Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science & Technology (CREST), University of Stellenbosch; Researcher, DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Scientometrics and STI Policy, South Africa
What is Transformative Innovation in the context of South Africa?

Followed by Facilitated Open Discussion on future research to advance transformative innovation policy in South Africa


PARALLEL SESSION 1B: FINLAND: LOW-CARBON AND SMART MOBILITY SOLUTIONS FOR PASSENGER TRANSPORT

Abstract
Traffic is the second largest global greenhouse gas producer after energy production, with a share of more than 20%. 90% of the gases produced by the traffic will come from road traffic. The emission of gases from traffic is estimated to grow by 250% during the next 30 years. Taking into account, the remarkable target reduction in greenhouse gas emission for Finland set by the European Commission, there is an urgent need for disruptive system innovation in road transport. In Finland, the discussion of such innovations has thus far geared towards many directions, including increasing the use of biofuel, promoting the breakthrough of electric vehicles, seamless traffic solutions, sharing economy solutions as well as encouraging cycling, walking and mobile work.

This session focuses on Finnish policies and the role that Tekes has played in promoting transformative change in Finnish passenger transport, with a special emphasis on the emergence and consolidation of the mobility-as-a-service (MaaS) concept. MaaS refers to a service package that enables a reliable travel from door to door so that it is possible for people to give up on their own car without lowering the quality level of mobility. Of all innovations for bringing about transformative change in road traffic, MaaS represents the most disruptive and ambitious niche-innovation at this moment. The emergence, development and future challenges of the concept will be discussed.

Panellists
Elise Ramstad, (Chair), Senior Advisor, Tekes
Paula Kivimaa Senior Research Fellow, Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand (CIED), SPRU, University of Sussex, UK
Christopher Palmberg, Development Manager, Tekes – the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation
What is Transformative Innovation in the context of South Africa? Daniel Johansson, Head of Business Development, Vinnova, Sweden
What is Transformative Innovation in the context of South Africa? Dr Matthias Weber, Head of Business Unit, Austrian Institute for Technology


PARALLEL SESSION 2A: COLOMBIA: PRODUCTIVE TRANSFORMATIONS IN SPECIALITY COFFEE PRODUCTION

Abstract
Colombia now has more than four decades of experience of science, technology and innovation (STI) policy. It has established institutions of governance and has made efforts towards developing a coordinating structure to bring together stakeholders from the state academia, and private sector to map out national priorities. However, little progress has been made in addressing societal challenges and in particular reaching remote areas of the country and areas affected by the internal violence in the country and where science technology and innovation policy is expected to make a relevant contribution in the post-conflict era. As STI policy is expected to address broader social challenges, so policy making in Colombia has to urgently begin to develop new capabilities. Incorporating Frame 3 policy making represents a major challenge in Colombia since the practices of experimentation and risk- taking in policy have traditionally been discouraged and this has tended to perpetuate a narrow perspective on policy innovation. Nevertheless, opportunities to innovate and incorporate new actors exist, in particular through new schemes such as the Royalty Scheme which decentralises decision making on funding STI projects to regional stakeholders. This session will touch upon these issues.

Panellists
Maria Isabel Velez Agudelo, (Chair), Head of Policy and Evaluation Unit, Colciencias, Colombia
Elisa Arond Lecturer, Universidad de Los Andes; PhD candidate Clark University, USA


PARALLEL SESSION 2B: NORWAY: RESPONSIBLE RESEARCH AND INNOVATION PRACTICES IN BIOTECHNOLOGY FOR INNOVATION

Abstract
Through a process of experimentation and consultation largely directed and governed by the Research Council of Norway (RCN), several applied science and technology funding programmes including those in the life sciences have adopted a set of practices called ‘Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI).’ These practices are aimed at anticipating the social needs and purposes of scienti c research, requiring researchers to engage in a process of re ection in planning and applying for funding, and hopefully during the life of their research projects. This session will provide a basic guide to the concept and practice of RRI re ecting on how it involves a transformative change in research rationale and, in some cases, practice. To understand the transformative nature of RRI in Norway we will examine the origin of the RRI idea in the Norwegian context, the practices that are employed in implementing the RRI approach and the complexity of embedding these practices across a diverse group of scienti c and technical researchers. Some highlights of this case are the recognition that researchers are often (though not always) willing and interested in undertaking this process, that the implementation of the practices has required (and continues to require) capability building in the Research Council, and that implementing the RRI process involves considerable care to avoid it becoming a ‘box ticking’ or burdensome imposition on researchers. The last of these points is particularly relevant for countries anticipating adopting the EU’s RRI framework or adapting it to local circumstances.

Panellists
Elise Husum, (Chair), Director of the Department for Partnerships in Industry, Division for Innovation, The Research Council of Norway
Elisabeth Gulbrandsen, Special Adviser, Division for Innovation, Department for Strategic Analysis and Development, Research Council of Norway
Ed Steinmueller, Professor of Information & Communication Technology Policy, SPRU, University of Sussex, UK


PARALLEL SESSION 2C: SWEDEN: CHALLENGE-DRIVEN INNOVATION INITIATIVES

Abstract
Challenge-Driven Innovation (CDI) is a programme launched by the Swedish innovation agency Vinnova in April 2011. The aim is to fund projects that develop sustainable solutions to tackle current societal challenges. These challenges require innovative solutions that go beyond traditional research elds and ‘silo-thinking’. Instead, the programme has been designed in a way to promote opportunities for transformative innovations by encouraging demand, challenge and user-driven projects spanning various actors and industries.

In this session the main ndings of the case study work on the CDI will be presented including re ections by Vinnova, and there will be further discussion on the implications of these results for the design of future policy interventions. In particular, the session will illustrate why new policy programmes require organisational change within the innovation agency itself as well as why a ‘one size ts all’ design of innovation programmes should give way to more exible schemes that take into account the different industrial preconditions and problem characteristics.

Panellists
Göran Marklund, Deputy Director General and Head of Operational Development, Vinnova, Sweden
Daniel Johansson, Head of Business Development, Vinnova, Sweden


PARALLEL SESSION 3A: REVISITING SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION: COUNTRY REVIEWS FROM A TRANSFORMATIVE CHANGE PERSPECTIVE

Abstract
This session discusses how to broaden National Science, Technology and Innovation Policy Reviews to integrate Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Current frameworks, such as the UNCTAD STIP Review framework are largely based on the National Innovation Systems framework (Frame 2), the methodology views economic development as essentially involving a process of productive capacity building and structural transformation in which technological upgrading and innovation play an integral part. These current frameworks remain inadequate to comprehensively address the SDGs, which are broad in scope and ambitious in nature. A central question for the session is whether, and how, introducing the notion of transformative change may help the UNCTAD STIP Review framework, and other frameworks, such as the ones used by the OECD to deal with the SDGs (or environmental and social challenges).

Panellists
Johan Schot, (Chair), Director of SPRU, Professor in History of Technology and Sustainability Transition Studies, University of Sussex, UK
Michael Lim, Policy Review Section, Science, Technology and ICT Branch, UNCTAD-DTL Opening statement on on UNCTAD framework for science, technology and policy Reviews
Michal Miedzinski, UCL Institute for Sustainable Resources
Jenifer Muwuliza, Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, Uganda
Anteneh Senbeta, Ministry of Science and Technology, Ethiopia (tbc)


PARALLEL SESSION 3B: R&D INVESTMENT AND TRANSFORMATION

Abstract
The session brings together panellists that have had experience in attempting to reorient national, and/or regional, science and technology policy towards social needs such as those contained in the Sustainable Development Goals or other Grand Challenges. A premise of this session is that such re-orientation involves a debate. On the one hand, some advocate the values of unimpeded or curiosity-driven scienti c investigation. On the other hand, some advocate the opportunities provides by approaches such as research for social needs, challenge-led innovation, or responsible research and innovation.

Panellists
Ed Steinmueller, (Chair), Professor of Information & Communication Technology Policy, SPRU, University of Sussex, UK
Matthias Weber, Head of Unit Research, Technology and Innovation Policy, Austrian Institute of Technology, Austria
Göran Marklund, Deputy Director General and Head of Operational Development, Vinnova, Sweden
Michael Kahn, Professor Extraordinaire in the Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science and Technology at Stellenbosch University


PARALLEL SESSION 3C: SOCIAL JUSTICE AND TRANSFORMATIONS TO SUSTAINABILITY: SNAPSHOTS OF CURRENT WORK

Abstract
Social justice is crucial and intrinsic to sustainability. But it is not self-evident how to reconcile tensions with other sustainability imperatives. The deeper and more pervasive the envisaged transformations, the greater the dilemmas over: The roles of social movements? The scope for plurality? The opportunities and dangers of centralised power? Drawing on some key initiatives around these issues currently underway in Africa as part of wider transdisciplinary collaborations, this session will inform wider discussions at TIPC concerning some tricky – sometimes neglected – challenges and some inspiring grounds for hope.

The session will be introduced by four ten-minute contributions, followed by a general discussion and a nal panel round-up.

Panellists
Andy Stirling, (Chair), Professor of Science & Technology Policy, SPRU, University of Sussex; Co-Director, STEPS Centre; Sussex Energy Group, UK The STEPS pathways approach: culturing transformation
Bitrina Diyamett, Executive Director, Science Technology and Innovation Policy Research Organisation (STIPRO), Tanzania
Innovation and sustainable economic development
Mark Swilling, Professor of Sustainable Development, Stellenbosch University; Academic Director of the Sustainability Institute; Co-Director of the Stellenbosch Centre for Complex Systems in Transition, South Africa
Just transitions in Africa
Joanes Atela,Senior Research Fellow, Climate Resilient Economies, African Centre for Technology Studies, Nairobi
Transforming pro-poor energy access in Africa


PARALLEL SESSION 3D: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN THE EVALUATION OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION

Abstract
Traditionally, science, technology, and innovation (STI) policy evaluation has focused on the assessment of scienti c merit and reputation or technical soundness, and the strategies and governance structures to achieve them. However, there is an increasing demand for evaluation of STI activities and policies in relation to social, economic, and environmental challenges. Challenges such as climate change span different dimensions of society and interact with other challenges such as sustainable economic development. For this reason, they require evaluation frameworks that go beyond the scienti c and the technical. In this expanded framing, variables such as relevance, social and environmental impact, diversity, and inclusion become an important part of evaluation criteria. In this session, we will explore the role of evaluation of STI activities and policies at a time of societal challenges. The topics are:

  • Evaluating research policy: lessons learned from the South African experience
  • The marginalisation of knowledge in research assessments and the need to open up STI evaluation
  • The role of evaluation in science, technology and innovation policy for inclusive development
  • Towards an evaluation framework for transformative innovation policies

Panellists
Diego Chavarro, (Chair) Policy Advisor, Policy Design & Evaluation Unit, Colciencias, Colombia
Jordi Molas-Gallart, Research Professor, INGENIO (Spanish Council for Scienti c Research – Polutechnic University of Valencia), Spain, Visiting Fellow, SPRU, University of Sussex, UK
Glenda Kruss Van Der Heever Deputy Executive Director, Centre for Science, Technology and Innovation Indicators (CeSTII), South Africa
Hasa Mlawa, Professor of Technology and Innovation Management, University of Dar es Salaam


PARALLEL SESSION 4A: POLICY MIXES FOR TRANSFORMATIVE CHANGE

Abstract
Within innovation studies, there has recently been an increasing interest in policy mixes which can be understood as ‘complex arrangements of multiple goals and means which, in many cases, have developed incrementally over many years’. It has long been acknowledged that a combination of technology ‘push and demand pull’ instruments in policy mixes are especially relevant when discussing how STI policies can foster transformative change which cannot be delivered by single instruments. There is an increasing recognition of the importance of viewing STI policy through the lens of policy mixes by policy makers (e.g. OECD, IEA, EU).

  1. Evaluating research policy: lessons learned from the South African experience
  2. The marginalisation of knowledge in research assessments and the need to open up STI evaluation
  3. The role of evaluation in science, technology and innovation policy for inclusive development
  4. Towards an evaluation framework for transformative innovation policies

Panellists
Florian Kern, (Chair) Senior Lecturer, SPRU, University of Sussex; Co-Director, Sussex Energy Group, UK
Sandrine Kergroach, Analyst, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
Edurne Magro, Researcher, Orkestra-Basque Institute of Competitiveness
Mapula Tshangela, Senior Policy Advisor, National Sustainable Development, Ministry of Environment; Researcher, Stellenbosch University, South Africa


PARALLEL SESSION 4B: INNOVATION POLICIES FOR THE INFORMAL ECONOMY

Abstract
Supporting innovation has become a common concern for governments across the world in order to maintain competitive advantage and increase economic growth. However, the proliferation of innovation strategies, especially in the context of developing countries, is often accompanied by growing disparities between the rich and the poor, as well as the intractable presence of the informal economy. This panel discusses the challenges and opportunities that emerge when we include the informal economy in the domain of innovation policies, with the aim of promoting innovation while reducing exclusions and inequality.

The session is planned to consist of short (15 min) presentations (based on new research or practical experiences from policy practitioners), followed by a shared panel discussion.

Panellists
Erika Kraemer-Mbula, (Chair) Senior Researcher, South African Research Chair in Industrial Development, University of Johannesburg; Associate Professor Extraordinary, Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science & Technology (CREST), University of Stellenbosch; Researcher, DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Scientometrics and STI Policy, South Africa
Nonhlanhla Mkhize, Chief Director for Innovation for Inclusive Development, Science and Technology for Social Impact, Department of Science and Technology, South Africa
Philippe Mawoko, Director of the African Observatory for Science, Technology & Innovation (AOSTI), Equatorial Guinea
Glenda Kruss Van Der Heever, Deputy Executive Director, Centre for Science, Technology and Innovation Indicators (CeSTII), South Africa


PARALLEL SESSION 4C: POLICY EXPERIMENTATION

Abstract
Policy, grassroots and entrepreneurial experimentation encompass a ourishing set of practices and approaches aimed at generating opportunities for learning and change. This session explores what is policy experimentation and examines how policy makers may engage with it in the context of Transformative Innovation Policy (TIP). It, thus discusses, the characteristics of different experimental policy engagements and their usefulness in the context of the Consortium, building on examples and the learning from the rst year of the TIPC.

Panellists
Johan Schot, (Chair) Director of SPRU, Professor in History of Technology and Sustainability Transition Studies, University of Sussex, UK
Jonas Torrens, Doctoral Candidate and Research Assistant, SPRU, University of Sussex
Elisa Arond, Lecturer, Universidad de Los Andes; PhD candidate Clark University, USA
Fred Steward, Emeritus Professor, Policy Studies Institute, Westminster University and Visiting Professor at Centre for Environmental Policy at the Imperial College London


PARALLEL SESSION 4D: NATIONAL SYSTEMS OF INNOVATION TRANSFORMATION

Abstract
The National Systems of Innovation framing emerged during the 1980’s to address some of the consequences for individual nation states of the experience with modern economic growth – the intensi cation of international competition, globalization, the prospects of being left behind, and the promise of catching-up. The NSI concept focused attention on the various con gurations of organisations concerned with the generation and utilization of scienti c and technological knowledge.

In South Africa, the incoming democratic government formulated a White Paper in 1996 to guide future policy efforts in the development and application of science and technology. Formally, the White Paper was built on the twin concepts of ‘innovation’ and the ‘national system of innovation’. At the time, the NSI policy approach was novel and represented one of the rst attempts of directing policy action by focusing on the system of innovation. A new White Paper, currently at an advanced stage of development and formal consultation, continues to focus on building a coherent and transformative NSI that can improve its socio- economic impact. Drawing on international and national developments, this session will focus on opportunities for building on previous achievements and learning: intensifying what has worked, discarding what has not worked, and introducing new policy approaches where necessary.

Panellists
Imraan Patel, (Chair) Deputy Director General, Socio-Economic Innovation Partnerships, Department of Science & Technology, South Africa
Mlungisi Cele, Acting CEO, National Advisory Council on Innovation. South Africa
Rasigan Maharaj, Chief Director, Institute for Economic Research on Innovation, Tshwane University of Technology; Node Head, DST/ NRF Centre of Excellence in Scientometrics and Science, Technology and Innovation Policy
Arie Rip, Professor of Philosophy of Science and Technology in the School of Management and Governance of the University of Twente


PARALLEL SESSION 5A: INNOVATION FOR INCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT

Abstract
In recent years policy makers, businesses and academics have begun to call for new approaches to thinking about the contribution that different types of innovation makes to economic and social development and to the environment. Inclusive innovation or innovation for inclusive development now represents an important strand of academic and policy thinking. Sections of the private sector are also actively engaged in innovating for, and with, lower income and excluded populations, including for less damaging environmental impact. This focus also encourages us to think beyond skills and sectors normally associated with innovation ‘success’ such as those rooted in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) and to think about both how a) broader sets of skills can contribute to creating innovation that has bene cial societal outcomes and b) understanding the kind of contributions that innovation in other sectors, such as culture and arts can make to inclusive development. This panel will explore:

  • What kinds of organisations and institutional approaches are important for promoting innovation for inclusive development?
  • To what extent does inclusive innovation mean disruption of current norms and processes in different sectors and in policy processes?
  • How can we best think about success and failure with respect to innovation for inclusive development?

Panellists
Joanna Chataway, (Chair) Professor of Science & Technology Policy, SPRU, University of Sussex, UK
Nonhlanhla Mkhize, Chief Director for Innovation for Inclusive Development, Science and Technology for Social Impact, Department of Science and Technology, South Africa
Rasigan Maharaj, Chief Director: Institute for Economic Research on Innovation, Tshwane University of Technology, Node Head: DST/ NRF Centre of Excellence in Scientometrics and Science, Technology and Innovation Policy
Andy Stirling, Professor of Science & Technology Policy, SPRU, University of Sussex; Co-Director, STEPS Centre; Sussex Energy Group, UK


PARALLEL SESSION 5B: CAPABILITY BUILDING AND TRAINING FOR TRANSFORMATIVE INNOVATION POLICY AND POLICYMAKING

Abstract
We know that capabilities play signi cant roles in innovation and policymaking. To realise the goals of the Transformative Innovation Policy (TIP) approach, encapsulated in the SDGs, we require strategies that support efforts to (1) build new capabilities; (2) strengthen existing capabilities; and, (3) link capabilities within and across innovation and policy ecosystems. Therefore, it is imperative that capabilities building for TIP and challenge-led innovation policymaking, transcends individual, organisational (or institutional), and sector-speci c efforts – if we are to expect systems-level impact embedded in the TIP thinking. One suggestion is to focus on capabilities building and training at systems level, i.e. involving multiple actors and stakeholders at the same time, in experimental (and “safe”) spaces. Participants in this session will critically explore two main questions: what capabilities and training are required for transformative change through innovation, and why? How can we organise to build such capabilities, design the relevant training, and measure the impacts?

In South Africa, the incoming democratic government formulated a White Paper in 1996 to guide future policy efforts in the development and application of science and technology. Formally, the White Paper was built on the twin concepts of ‘innovation’ and the ‘national system of innovation’. At the time, the NSI policy approach was novel and represented one of the rst attempts of directing policy action by focusing on the system of innovation. A new White Paper, currently at an advanced stage of development and formal consultation, continues to focus on building a coherent and transformative NSI that can improve its socio- economic impact. Drawing on international and national developments, this session will focus on opportunities for building on previous achievements and learning: intensifying what has worked, discarding what has not worked, and introducing new policy approaches where necessary.

Panellists
Chux Daniels, (Chair), Research Fellow in Science Technology and Innovation; Teaching Fellow in Innovation Studies, SPRU, University of Sussex, UK; Member of the African Union Commission M&E Committee on Science Technology and Innovation Strategy for Africa 2024
Roselida Owuor, Deputy Director of Research, National Research Foundation, Department of Research, Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Kenya
Flora Tibazarwa,, Programme Director, Southern African Innovation Support Programme II, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Michael Lim, Policy Review Section, Science, Technology and ICT Branch, UNCTAD, Switzerland
David Walwyn, Professor, Graduate School of Technology Management, Department of Engineering and Technology Management, University of Pretoria, South Africa


PARALLEL SESSION 5C: UPSCALING EXPERIMENTATION

Abstract
Experimentation in governance and for tackling social challenges has been increasingly popular among policymakers, practitioners and academics. Great expectations are based on experimentation in different contexts - for example, in urban transition, socio- technical innovation and formal policymaking - while there is rather little discussion on how, more speci cally, experimentation contributes to transformative change and Transformative Innovation Policy. Building on the earlier session on policy experiments, this session discusses: How can experiments upscale, diffuse or otherwise contribute to transformative change (or can they)? What is meant by upscaling, and what are the ways to best gain from experiments on transformative change? What are the ways in which upscaling (or alternatives to it) can be supported or directed? How can the in uence of experiments on transformative change be evaluated during and after the experimental phase?

Panellists
Paula Kivimaa, (Chair), Senior Research Fellow, Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand (CIED), SPRU, University of Sussex, UK
Mark Swilling, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Tuomo Alasoini, Tekes – the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation


PARALLEL SESSION 5D: CAN REGIONAL INNOVATION POLICY FACILITATE TRANSITIONS?

Abstract
Regional innovation policy lies at the centrepiece of STI investments in many countries. An important part of academic work in this area has analysed regional innovation policy through a lens that focuses on the structural impact of regional agglomerations and industrial upgrading. Nevertheless, there is also an important governance motivation here based on the belief that more decentralised decision making will lead to policy priorities in STI that are more responsive to local needs. The latter is particularly prominent in some low and middle income economies where signi cant regional variations in levels of wealth and development raise demands for more inclusive impacts from STI investments. This tallies strongly with discourses in transitions literature that emphasise opening up the policy process to new societal actors and supporting and facilitating grassroots initiatives that pose more environmentally and socially sustainable alternatives. Important questions arise concerning which regional policy instruments might address the challenges associated with transitions and the barriers that exist in doing so. This session will discuss and debate these questions taking into account the impact both on sector dynamics and policy processes.

Panellists
Matias Ramirez, (Chair), Senior Lecturer in Management, SPRU, University of Sussex, UK
Claudia Obando Rodriguez, Research Assistant and PhD candidate in Science Technology & Innovation, SPRU, University of Sussex, UK
Elise Husum,, Director of Department for Regional Research and Innovation, Research Council of Norway
Edurne Magro, Researcher, Orkestra-Basque Institute of Competitiveness

PRACTICAL
INFORMATION


VENUE
All sessions will take place in the Protea Fire and Ice Hotel, Menlyn, Pretoria.


TWITTER
Please join the conversation about the conference on Twitter: #TIPC2017Conf
For live tweets at plenary sessions and general updates, follow: @TIPConsortium.


GALA DINNER 20 SEPTEMBER 2017
All registered participants are invited to join the gala dinner.


TRANSPORTATION
Transfers from OR Tambo International Airp ort to Protea Fire and Ice Hotel in Pretoria are kindly supported by the National Research Foundation of South Africa.
For emergences kindly contact Ms Puleng Tshitlho on
+27 12 481 4061 or +27 71 876 1561


Acknowledgements
The members of the Transformative Innovation Policy Consortium would like to acknowledge the National Research Foundation of South Africa, and the Department of Science and Technology, South Africa for organising and hosting the conference. Special recognition is extended to Dr Sepo Hachigonta, Dr Priscilla Mensah, Ms Tshegofatso Thoka and Ms Puleng Tshitlho; and to the Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex, in particular Ms Geraldine Bloom eld, Ms Pip Bolton, and Ms Sarah Schepers.

Thanks also to the TIPC members and session Chairs for their input into the programme and speci c sessions.

Copyright © 2017 TIPC